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CoasterForce COVID-19 Vaccination Poll

What is your COVID-19 vaccination status?

  • Partially vaccinated (Pfizer)

    Votes: 21 21.6%
  • Fully vaccinated (Pfizer)

    Votes: 32 33.0%
  • Partially vaccinated (AstraZeneca)

    Votes: 1 1.0%
  • Fully vaccinated (AstraZeneca)

    Votes: 14 14.4%
  • Partially vaccinated (Moderna)

    Votes: 3 3.1%
  • Fully vaccinated (Moderna)

    Votes: 10 10.3%
  • Fully vaccinated (Johnson & Johnson)

    Votes: 3 3.1%
  • Partially vaccinated (Other)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Fully vaccinated (Other)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Haven’t had the vaccine yet, but intend to when called up

    Votes: 8 8.2%
  • Unsure whether to get the vaccine

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Definitely not getting the vaccine

    Votes: 5 5.2%

  • Total voters
    97

TilenB

Strata Poster
I was mainly referring to the fact that your post seemed to focus on personal protection as opposed to wider protection of the population, so I thought it might be worth raising. As I said, if wasn’t aimed at anyone in particular; I just thought it would be worth saying about so people are informed.

But I seem to have misinterpreted you, so I do apologise for that!
No problem! Looking back at it, I guess my little rant in the second paragraph could be interpreted in such a way. I'm just a bit frustrated that I'll might have to resort to trying to jump the line on the basis of me working in a pharmacy (which was considered to be a priority back when the vaccines started to roll out in January/February and likely still is), even if I personally feel that we should prioritize people that haven't been infected yet and not equate them to those that had COVID more than 6 months ago. 😕
 

Matt N

Strata Poster
To the UK folks... you have to wait 2 months in between Pfiezer shots?! It's three weeks for Pfeizer in the US, and 4 weeks for Moderna.

Pretty much every adult could get the vaccine by the end of April in the US. Had to wait an hour to get my first shot, as there was huge demand in Massachusetts during that first week. Luckily it was a walk on for the second shot. At this point demand has plummeted, and everyone here who wants a shot and is eligible can easily get one no problem.

For my first dose, my arm hurt like a bitch that night and the next morning, but was fortunate to have no symptoms at all my second. It's pretty fascinating hearing how everyone reacts differently... couple of my roommates had Pfiezer and woke up shivering and sweating the night of their second dose.
Which vaccine did you have, out of interest? Did you get Pfizer or Moderna? (I’m guessing not J&J, as you mentioned a second dose, and correct me if I’m wrong, but aren’t America not using AstraZeneca?)

Here in the UK, the dosage interval was 4 weeks for a very short period, but the government decided to extend it to 12 weeks in order to get as many people partially immune as possible, because it was judged that it would be more effective to give lots of people partial immunity than to give less people full immunity. This is an approach that initially worked, but the dosage interval is now back down to 8 weeks due to the rise of the Delta (Indian) variant in the UK, and the importance of the second dose in mitigating against that particular strain.

It wasn’t rigidly 12 weeks in every case, though; I got my first Pfizer dose on 27th March, and my second Pfizer dose on 20th May, so I waited just under 8 weeks for my second. Again, though, that might be down to the shortening of the dosage interval for the top 9 priority groups (my autism puts me in group 6).
 

Hutch

Strata Poster
Which vaccine did you have, out of interest? Did you get Pfizer or Moderna? (I’m guessing not J&J, as you mentioned a second dose, and correct me if I’m wrong, but aren’t America not using AstraZeneca?)

Here in the UK, the dosage interval was 4 weeks for a very short period, but the government decided to extend it to 12 weeks in order to get as many people partially immune as possible, because it was judged that it would be more effective to give lots of people partial immunity than to give less people full immunity. This is an approach that initially worked, but the dosage interval is now back down to 8 weeks due to the rise of the Delta (Indian) variant in the UK, and the importance of the second dose in mitigating against that particular strain.

It wasn’t rigidly 12 weeks in every case, though; I got my first Pfizer dose on 27th March, and my second Pfizer dose on 20th May, so I waited just under 8 weeks for my second. Again, though, that might be down to the shortening of the dosage interval for the top 9 priority groups (my autism puts me in group 6).
Sorry, thought I mentioned it, but I had Pfizer.

The US originally had longer time intervals in between the two shots (about a month) for similar reasons as you stated: prioritize as many people to get the first shot. Since then demand has died a bit while the supply is still high, so they've cut the interval down to a few weeks.
 

Matt N

Strata Poster
Sorry, thought I mentioned it, but I had Pfizer.

The US originally had longer time intervals in between the two shots (about a month) for similar reasons as you stated: prioritize as many people to get the first shot. Since then demand has died a bit while the supply is still high, so they've cut the interval down to a few weeks.
I wonder why the demand has fallen so much in the USA? From your experience, is anti-vaccination sentiment quite high in America, or do people simply just not feel the need to get vaccinated?

I know that President Biden is trying all sorts of initiatives to get people vaccinated in America, such as free beer, so that might change soon…
 

Hutch

Strata Poster
I wonder why the demand has fallen so much in the USA? From your experience, is anti-vaccination sentiment quite high in America, or do people simply just not feel the need to get vaccinated?

I know that President Biden is trying all sorts of initiatives to get people vaccinated in America, such as free beer, so that might change soon…
It looks like about 40% of the US population is fully vaccinated (136 million), and about half the population has at least one shot or more (Pfizer, Moderna, or J&J).

More info on the numbers here

Ultimately, the government supplied at lot more vaccines than anticipated, so the rate of vaccines doled out really skyrocketed at first. I suppose I can't speak for what it's like for the rest of the country, but it seems that if anyone wants a vaccine, there are plenty available. I personally don't know anyone, friends or family (not just from my home state), that have had trouble getting their first shot.

As for anti-vaxxers, there's definitely a decent chunk of those people in the country. Many people are worried about side effects. I've heard of people having vaccine symptoms worse than covid symptoms, I guess everyone reacts differently. Considering that the risk of not getting the vaccine is...well...death by Covid, then getting the shot is worth it, even if it might end ****ing you up for a day or two.

And maybe some people are like, "Oh, the spread has slowed down, so should I really bother getting the vaccine?". And then of course there are people that still don't believe in covid lol.

I mean, if someone doesn't want to get the vaccine, that's their choice. They may or may not end up with covid, but at least we know it's highly unlikely for someone vaccinated to pass covid onto someone unvaccinated. So at this point, it's important to focus on yourself, family, and friends to stay safe.
 

Edward M

Strata Poster
President Biden is trying all sorts of initiatives to get people vaccinated in America, such as free beer
This is one of the most American statements I've ever read.

As for me, I got my first shot of Pfizer all the way back in late March, so I've been fully vaccinated for almost a month now (!). I'd definitely encourage everyone on the forums to get the vaccine if possible, although, judging from the poll results, it seems most people are either partly/fully vaccinated or plan to be.
 

Matt N

Strata Poster
I mean, if someone doesn't want to get the vaccine, that's their choice. They may or may not end up with covid, but at least we know it's highly unlikely for someone vaccinated to pass covid onto someone unvaccinated. So at this point, it's important to focus on yourself, family, and friends to stay safe.
Of course; it’s entirely an issue of individual liberty, and it’s your choice if you want to get vaccinated or not. I was personally very keen to get vaccinated, and I would definitely encourage getting vaccinated, but I’m also not going to judge anyone who doesn’t want to accept the vaccine; it’s your choice, and it’s entirely up to you to weigh up the pros and cons.
 

gavin

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Social Media Team
I've had both doses of Pfizer (3 weeks between doses here). They prioritised teachers quite early here, so I had the second does a couple of months ago. Had a sore arm for a bit, slightly longer after the second dose, but that was about it.

Despite the vaccine being easily available and accessible, the uptake has been very low (around 20% so far), which is infuriating.
 

JoshC.

Giga Poster
Being a young whippersnapper at the age of 27, I'm still not vaccinated yet. Expected it to be a couple more weeks until 27 year olds are invited.

But to my surprise, I got my golden text message this morning inviting me to book my first vaccine. So I'm getting my first shot tomorrow morning. Not sure which one it will be yet though.

Had it done just now (have you even had the vaccine if you don't say so online?). Didn't have an issue with the needle despite my fears which is all good.

With all the moving between chairs and scenes and being told where to go, it felt like am elongated pre-show to Walibi Holland's Clinic (knowing nod towards @Howie ;) )
 

Matt N

Strata Poster
Had it done just now (have you even had the vaccine if you don't say so online?). Didn't have an issue with the needle despite my fears which is all good.

With all the moving between chairs and scenes and being told where to go, it felt like am elongated pre-show to Walibi Holland's Clinic (knowing nod towards @Howie ;) )
Which jab did you have, if you don’t mind saying? Did you end up getting Pfizer or Moderna?
 

FarleyFlavors

Mega Poster
As for anti-vaxxers, there's definitely a decent chunk of those people in the country.
There was an interesting documentary on telly the other night called The Anti-Vax Conspiracy which explained one of the reasons vaccine hesitancy is much higher in the States than it is in in the UK.

Much of the blame can be laid at the feet of one Andrew Wakefield, the slimeball British doctor who was struck off the UK medical registry for fraudulently claiming in the late nineties that the MMR vaccine caused autism. Completely unrepentant, he moved to the States, expanded his argument to be against all vaccines and built up a sizeable following. According to the programme, the arrival of Covid was like "manna from heaven" for these nutjobs, who used social media in a well-organized manner to spread their disinformation.

It'll probably come as no surprise that it's all about the cash. Wakefield is now a multi-millionaire living in a vast estate in Florida and shacked up with none other than - I kid you not - supermodel Elle Macpherson.
 

Eyebrows

Mega Poster
I’ve got both of my Pfizer microchips as of yesterday, thanks to the government allowing it for 12-15 year olds on May 12
 

Pokemaniac

Mountain monkey
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
The Norwegian government's approach to vaccination seems to have been "close the borders and keep the virus down with strict measures, wait, and we'll buy a crap-ton of vaccines on the cheap once the rest of Europe has vaccinated their population and they have more doses in storage than they know what to do with".

It seems to have worked too. The Covid rates here have been much lower than in most other countries. But it also means I won't get the first shot of a vaccine until September or so, being in the least prioritized age group. After recent outbreaks among young adults, they're bumping the 20-29 year olds ahead in the vaccination queue, but I'll be 30 from tomorrow, so no luck there.
 

Hyde

Matt SR
Staff member
Moderator
Social Media Team
It looks like about 40% of the US population is fully vaccinated (136 million), and about half the population has at least one shot or more (Pfizer, Moderna, or J&J).

More info on the numbers here

Ultimately, the government supplied at lot more vaccines than anticipated, so the rate of vaccines doled out really skyrocketed at first. I suppose I can't speak for what it's like for the rest of the country, but it seems that if anyone wants a vaccine, there are plenty available. I personally don't know anyone, friends or family (not just from my home state), that have had trouble getting their first shot.

As for anti-vaxxers, there's definitely a decent chunk of those people in the country. Many people are worried about side effects. I've heard of people having vaccine symptoms worse than covid symptoms, I guess everyone reacts differently. Considering that the risk of not getting the vaccine is...well...death by Covid, then getting the shot is worth it, even if it might end ****ing you up for a day or two.

And maybe some people are like, "Oh, the spread has slowed down, so should I really bother getting the vaccine?". And then of course there are people that still don't believe in covid lol.

I mean, if someone doesn't want to get the vaccine, that's their choice. They may or may not end up with covid, but at least we know it's highly unlikely for someone vaccinated to pass covid onto someone unvaccinated. So at this point, it's important to focus on yourself, family, and friends to stay safe.
Another thing to add here is the perception that the vaccines were developed too quickly in 1-year’s time, which leads to crazy conjecture like this:

This is unfortunately result of very poor education and vaccine awareness, especially around the medical revolution of mRNA that has been decades in the making and the reason why we were able to crank out vaccines so quickly relative to previous generations. (This is really more for Pfizer and Moderna, versus J&J or Sputnik, which are different fundamental vaccine designs)

To broadly generalize, it is in a case of everyone who hasn’t received the vaccine is an anti-vaxxer, but rather simply trying to put Covid out of their mind and priority (some coverage on that behavioral moment: https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsa...d-a-billion-bucks-from-mastercard-arent-enoug). Horribly annoying, as America could be moving so much faster on vaccination rate.
 
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