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Bobbejaanland | Fury | Gerstlauer Triple Launch Coaster

Pokemaniac

Mountain monkey
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Good god, y'all. This is just another Guerst pseudo-shuttle. It won't be the next Steel Vengeance.
Perhaps not, but it won't be the next Untamed either. It's a fairly large and custom layout, and looks pretty innovative too. And as @CrashCoaster pointed out, it's as tall as Takabisha, being one of the biggest coasters Gerstlauer has ever delivered. Sure, it's no SteVe, and no Helix or Taron, but it shows that Gerstlauer is pushing in that direction. They're not just a manufacturer of cloned Eurofighters or funny little spinners anymore, they're delivering fairly large custom, multi-launch white-knuckle coasters. We're seeing innovation from Gerstlauer here, and I'd say that's worth cheering for. Not that Fury is the only, first, or even the most notable example of Gerstlauer going big, but it's indicative of a trend. They might not be as merited as Mack, B&M or Intamin, but we're definitely past the days when the phrase "It's going to be a Gerstlauer" was received with the same kind of reaction as the phrase "You'll have to amputate".
 

Dar

Member
Perhaps not, but it won't be the next Untamed either. It's a fairly large and custom layout, and looks pretty innovative too. And as @CrashCoaster pointed out, it's as tall as Takabisha, being one of the biggest coasters Gerstlauer has ever delivered. Sure, it's no SteVe, and no Helix or Taron, but it shows that Gerstlauer is pushing in that direction. They're not just a manufacturer of cloned Eurofighters or funny little spinners anymore, they're delivering fairly large custom, multi-launch white-knuckle coasters. We're seeing innovation from Gerstlauer here, and I'd say that's worth cheering for. Not that Fury is the only, first, or even the most notable example of Gerstlauer going big, but it's indicative of a trend. They might not be as merited as Mack, B&M or Intamin, but we're definitely past the days when the phrase "It's going to be a Gerstlauer" was received with the same kind of reaction as the phrase "You'll have to amputate".
I wish they would invest a little more into the track manufacture side of things. Their rides look really fun and interesting, I enjoyed The Smiler and think it's a pretty clever design, but they're let down time and again by either poor profiling from the start, or increasing roughness as they age.
 
The section in the foreground is the swing launch, the section in the background is the "brake" section. Makes more sense to slow the train down with LSMs and then be able to move the train with LSMs, in stead of solid metal brake fins and drive tires.
 

Hixee

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The section in the foreground is the swing launch, the section in the background is the "brake" section. Makes more sense to slow the train down with LSMs and then be able to move the train with LSMs, in stead of solid metal brake fins and drive tires.
This logic is sound, and probably just goes to show how much the cost of LSM systems have dropped over the years. Historically you'd never have been able to justify the price!
 

Antinos

Slut for Spinners
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I wonder if utilizing LSMs for brakes would open up some opportunity for kinetic energy recovery like that one Maurer Sohne model does? If that is what they are doing here, the energy savings might be worth the potential added investment.
 
^Definitely possible. Although IIRC the "regenerative braking" that Phobia Phear does (the energy from braking powers the third launch or something) is why that ride cost a fat $22m.

I was more talking about using LSMs to slow down and move the train is a better system than "normal" magnetic brakes just from a variables standpoint. Empty train vs. full train, cold day vs. hot day, the train can stop at different positions, which would require drive tires placed on most of the launch. Or maybe it :emoji_poop:'n launches into the final spike, idk.
 

Matt N

Well-Known Member
^Definitely possible. Although IIRC the "regenerative braking" that Phobia Phear does (the energy from braking powers the third launch or something) is why that ride cost a fat $22m.
Wait; are you referring to Phobia Phear Coaster as in the Sky Rocket II at Lake Compounce? If you are, I genuinely can't believe that an SRII cost $22m!
 

Kw6sTheater

Member
$22 million FOR A SKYROCKET II?! Oh, the things they could've bought... drools over a custom S&S air launch coaster on the hillside of Lake Compounce

Back on topic, I am genuinely surprised by how rapidly Fury's construction has picked up! Less than a month ago, there was no track on site... but now, the main hill and launch section are already done. It's no wonder to me now the CoasterFORCE MANUFACTURERS entry on Gerstlauer states, "Gerstlauer are often commended for their speedy construction."
 

Antinos

Slut for Spinners
Social Media Team
Wait; are you referring to Phobia Phear Coaster as in the Sky Rocket II at Lake Compounce? If you are, I genuinely can't believe that an SRII cost $22m!
$22 million FOR A SKYROCKET II?! Oh, the things they could've bought... drools over a custom S&S air launch coaster on the hillside of Lake Compounce

Back on topic, I am genuinely surprised by how rapidly Fury's construction has picked up! Less than a month ago, there was no track on site... but now, the main hill and launch section are already done. It's no wonder to me now the CoasterFORCE MANUFACTURERS entry on Gerstlauer states, "Gerstlauer are often commended for their speedy construction."

Regenerative braking is a really tricky thing to properly execute. Having some sort of KER system or regen. braking would require a bit more hardware to capture and store that energy as well as some protective measures to ensure that the recovered energy isn't overloading the system.

As @CoasterMac305 mentioned, having an active system like LSMs (as opposed to a passive system magnetic fins) allows for greater control over the ride's systems (the calibrator can actually program in feedback loops) which will allow the ride to operate with higher precision. In this case, it could enable the park to shave a couple seconds off the ride cycle by stopping right where they want instead of ten feet short or too far due to the previously mentioned variables.
 

Hixee

Flojector
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Can you imagine what it would feel like to spend $22mil on a cred, and end up with a Sky Rocket II? Makes me feel a bit sick.

:p

On a serious note though, I wonder what their business case for it was. If this is to be believed, they normally come in around $6mil (http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Superman:_Ultimate_Flight_(Six_Flags_Discovery_Kingdom), however I can't (after about three minutes of Googling) find reference to the $22mil. I can only assume that includes a load of other stuff (paths/shops/etc)? Surely...?
 

Pokemaniac

Mountain monkey
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On a serious note though, I wonder what their business case for it was. If this is to be believed, they normally come in around $6mil (http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Superman:_Ultimate_Flight_(Six_Flags_Discovery_Kingdom), however I can't (after about three minutes of Googling) find reference to the $22mil. I can only assume that includes a load of other stuff (paths/shops/etc)? Surely...?
If I were quite the cynic, I'd say they did it the Disney way. Lake Compounce's parent company goes in as a middle man, buys the SRII from Premier for $6 million (and paths, shops, etc. for a few million more), and installs it at the park. For this service, the park pays $22 million to the middle man, that is, the parent company. Tax-wise, this is now construction expenses and not an internal transaction of cash within the chain, and so it can be written off instead of heavily taxed like a transfer of profit usually is.

Or the $22 million figure is heavily exaggerated. "Look, we spent all this money, we made a great investment! Come experience the awesome stuff we bought for all that money!"
 

CrashCoaster

Well-Known Member
I'm confused by what it means by backwards. Does it mean the opposite way round the circuit or the majority of the ride being backwards?
 

Marnit

New Member
It has a dual turn table, it means the train will be rotated 90 degrees left, or right.
So your train will be going backwards through it instead of forwards.

I do not really like that poll idea though, considering each train seats 12 riders, you need to have luck to get the one you want.
And it may be possible you love one way, and hate the other, with no way to know what it'll do.

I like the idea of the backwards option, but in my opinion a double queue line would have made infinitely more sense than voting during the ride...
 
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