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Six Flags Saudi Arabia(?) | Saudi Arabia | Theme Park

redheadedRobin

Roller Poster
The guy is also a "high ranking member of the Saudi Foreign Ministry". Of course he's going to say this. It's like me asking Jeff Bezos if he recommends getting an Amazon Prime account.


Yeah, not really selling it for me tbh ;) Why would I want to visit a place in which I must hide a large part of my identity, a part which can't be changed, just to avoid violence or prosecution?


And there's the thing. I ain't spending my hard-earned tourism pennies to fund a nation that treats it's citizens in this way. Not saying you're a fundamentally flawed person for visiting, but it wouldn't sit right with me. I know there's not really such thing as an ethical purchase under capitalism, most transactions will fund something bad and there's not much you can do about it. However, it's pretty easy to not visit a country that's as backwards as Saudi Arabia, so I feel that me not visiting is the right thing for me to do.


I'm all for following the rules when on holiday. However in a normal country, the rules are things like "don't be drunk and disorderly" or "drive with your headlights on 24/7".

But I mean, if you wanna go on an expensive holiday with no sex or even alcohol, you're free to do so! I'll stick to places where I can have a beer and hold a bloke's hand without getting locked up :)

As @Stevie said, on point 👌
 

Christian

Hyper Poster
The guy is also a "high ranking member of the Saudi Foreign Ministry". Of course he's going to say this. It's like me asking Jeff Bezos if he recommends getting an Amazon Prime account.

Ofcource he will do everything to sell his country, that's his job, but he gave me his card and told me to call him when I visit. Overall he seemed like a genuine guy.

I fully respect the choice to not visit these types of countries. My dad also refuses to join me when I go to the UAE, Israel, Cuba, etc for similar reasons. Personally, I believe in visiting new places to experience what they have to offer and see their culture. Even if I dont agree with it. I always think it's the people themselves who shall create and demand change, not foreigners. My only choices are to either visit or not visit. Both are perfectly honorable choices. The problem is just that when refusing to visit places on ethical grounds you mostly don't have any place to go on earth.

Maybe one day I will be able to be in Saudi, watching the red sea sunset with a beer in one hand and a bloke's shaft in the other. That day might one day come. Untill then my straight acting skills are pretty good.

On an other note. I am also quite baffled by Saudi Arabia's push for the "mass market" tourism segment. With these kinds of restrictions that will be difficult. Only the ultra luxury and niche segments would work.
 

Ethan

Strata Poster
Personally, I believe in visiting new places to experience what they have to offer and see their culture. Even if I dont agree with it. I always think it's the people themselves who shall create and demand change, not foreigners.
Pretty hard for them to do in Saudi Arabia, where even peaceful demonstrations are forbidden and lead to awful punishment.

The problem is just that when refusing to visit places on ethical grounds you mostly don't have any place to go on earth.
I agree that any place you visit will have flaws and laws you may not agree with, even my own country has them. But I would be careful with this, as some countries are objectively worse than others. It's like when people refuse to vote because "all politicians are as bad as each other". That's simply not true, there are dangerous people out there. Italy, for example, hasn't legalised gay marriage, but I can easily visit there knowing that I will not be punished for being myself. Saudi Arabia is not like this, not all countries are equal.
 

roomraider

Best Topic Starter
Pretty hard for them to do in Saudi Arabia, where even peaceful demonstrations are forbidden and lead to awful punishment.
And this recent story demonstrates that perfectly


34 years in jail followed by a 34 year travel ban for a women who tweeted against the regime.

Any bluster coming from officials that the country is changing and improving its human rights laws is constantly shown to be complete rubbish. It's all part of this kind of tourism washing they have going on. "If we show we have good tourist destinations people might ignore the fact we haven't changed"

The acquisition of Newcastle United football club is another link in this chain of trying to make themselve seem better than they are.

I've been to some countries others might shirk at, Turkmenistan, Libya, Myanmar (2 of those for work) for example but even for me Saudi is a step too far. There has to be a line.

Putting someone essentially in jail for 68 years for a tweet isn't culture, it can't be put down to "well that's how they do things there you should respect it and visit anyway" it's flagrant human rights abuse from essentially a dictatorship that's scared of anyone speaking against them. Nothing to do with culture at all.

And yes it means I may miss some coasters in the long run but I think I can live with that.

I guess you could argue that these tourism projects will force change, the stupid decision to give Qatar the world cup for example has arguably improved workers conditions in the country now the world is watching, is it enough though? No, is it going to stay that way as soon as the world's attention is else where? Probably not.
 

Hixee

Flojector
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Social Media Team
I understand that there’s been a lot of debate about whether the project will ultimately come to fruition, but is this worth moving to construction?
Yeah, I reckon this seems fair. They're at least attempting to construct something... :p
 

Hyde

Matt SR
Staff member
Moderator
Social Media Team
Over at the waterpark, vertical work has finally begun. These foundations will make up the giant artificial mountain in the center of the waterpark, which will hold several slides;

I understand that there’s been a lot of debate about whether the project will ultimately come to fruition, but is this worth moving to construction?
giphy.gif
 

Rzx

Roller Poster
I'm really excited for this project since it's 40 minutes away from me, and there is no coasters in the country, but I'm starting to get worried that it's not going to happen, it's supposed to open next year 2023 but they barely started working in the project.

Please correct me if there's any mistakes in the spelling or grammar English isn't my first language
 

Pokemaniac

Mountain monkey
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
No scenario under the sun will see this park open in 2023, it's still quite a few years away. To be honest, even the preliminary groundwork & earthmoving is farther than I expected this park/project to go. So actual construction is exciting to see.
It could also be that the project has made it all the way to the "let's get some equipment and workers on site to show investors there is ongoing activity, perhaps a few more will take the bait before we hightail it to Bahamas with most of the money" stage. That wouldn't be unheard of either.
 

roomraider

Best Topic Starter
It could also be that the project has made it all the way to the "let's get some equipment and workers on site to show investors there is ongoing activity, perhaps a few more will take the bait before we hightail it to Bahamas with most of the money" stage. That wouldn't be unheard of either.
I suppose one advantage of it being in Saudi is if you are going to run off with all the money and reveal one of the Saudi Governments corner stone tourism plans to be a scam you better have a good escape plan and know how to disappear. That's one regime you don't want to piss off I'd imagine.
 

Antinos

Slut for Spinners
I suppose one advantage of it being in Saudi is if you are going to run off with all the money and reveal one of the Saudi Governments corner stone tourism plans to be a scam you better have a good escape plan and know how to disappear. That's one regime you don't want to piss off I'd imagine.
This. Everyone is so quick to call this project a money laundering scheme while conveniently forgetting or simply not realizing that there is a literal mountain of financial backing behind this project, and I'd think we'd be hard pressed to see anybody try and con the Saudi prince. I'd have to do some digging to find them again but the last time I saw numbers I want to say there was somewhere around $5B allocated for the whole entertainment district. AND considering the fact that we've already seen plenty of pictures of extensive infrastructure work (roadways, sewer system, numerous building foundations, etc) that's well along, they're certainly passed the "let's feign progress by just pushing piles of dirt around while stealing VC money" phase.
 

TPoseOnTantrum

Hyper Poster
Intamin is hiring for a construction manager to position in Riyadh for a "large scale and iconic project in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia", estimated to be "for about 2 years (possibly more)";
 

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TPoseOnTantrum

Hyper Poster
To me that seems way too optimistic. Going from desert to park in 2 years.
Tricky part is out of the way. They've already spent the last 2 years on serious groundwork and even some early foundations. It's more of a construction site right now rather than a desert, which is an achievement and already farther than anyone thought they would get. They should make a lot of progress over the next 24 months, not counting an opening.
 
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