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Fun Spot Atlanta | ArieForce One | Custom Steel RMC | 2022

JJLehto

Hyper Poster
Terrible name for sure, hated it since announcement and the POV they put out is pretty hilarious...saw random person NL renditions that were better than the official POV lol
All that said, that stuff is of course meaningless in the end ride does look damn fantastic

Edit: oof, shame the dude is a real ****face with the covid protocols. I wont go any further than his commentary screams out his overall ideology and I suppose it's not surprising.... (and thus why he would react that way, its pretty much par for the course sadly). But yeah, this may be one of the best rides at a small park out there and looks better than some other RMC's out there. Already got me planning an Atlanta weekend tbh.
 

TPoseOnTantrum

Hyper Poster
Triple post moment, groundbreaking ceremony was indeed held today. On one hand, I'm somewhat surprised by how low-key they've kept this, the park made no effort to promote this anywhere and its only after today's exclusive media reception that we may see more word spill out online. On the other hand, this was just a media event held for formal purposes, not very much worth hyping up;
 

Leon_K

Roller Poster
Really interested in this project. Only a bit odd that the support structure is going to be made out of steel. 1 it feels odd like this and 2 looks like an unnecessary waste of steel production when you just can have straight steel columns or a wooden structure. Although I have no idea how environmentally friendly wooden structures in compare with steel ones usually are?
 

Leon_K

Roller Poster
In terms of carbon footprint ... steel is worse by a couple orders of magnitude, if I recall correctly.
That is what I thought too. I know in architecture it is with the latest developments more durable to build with wood then to build with steel and concrete. Curious why the choice has been made to build this ride with this complicated steel structure.
 

Indy

Mega Poster
That is what I thought too. I know in architecture it is with the latest developments more durable to build with wood then to build with steel and concrete. Curious why the choice has been made to build this ride with this complicated steel structure.
The price of wood has gone up considerably since the start of pandemic and wood has to be replaced more often than steel. And I promise that Fun Spot is not concerned about the carbon footprint of their new roller coaster.

The structure isn't really complicated either. It's just a lattice structure which has been used for ages, including on all of RMC's previous coasters. It's a known process. Plus, without going into too much detail, this structure allows for more forgiveness during the construction process. Coasters aren't as simple as LEGO sets. Sometimes a piece of track will land inches away from where it needs to connect to a structure and it can be a pretty big pain to make the two align. Anytime you can introduce another structural member, it allows for slight adjustment because there is always a little bit of "slop" in it, or tolerance. RMC has mastered this. If you look closely at their rides, particularly where the track attaches to the structure, you'll notice a lot of slotted holes and hinges. It's all to accommodate field adjustments and ease construction.
 

Leon_K

Roller Poster
The price of wood has gone up considerably since the start of pandemic and wood has to be replaced more often than steel. And I promise that Fun Spot is not concerned about the carbon footprint of their new roller coaster.

The structure isn't really complicated either. It's just a lattice structure which has been used for ages, including on all of RMC's previous coasters. It's a known process. Plus, without going into too much detail, this structure allows for more forgiveness during the construction process. Coasters aren't as simple as LEGO sets. Sometimes a piece of track will land inches away from where it needs to connect to a structure and it can be a pretty big pain to make the two align. Anytime you can introduce another structural member, it allows for slight adjustment because there is always a little bit of "slop" in it, or tolerance. RMC has mastered this. If you look closely at their rides, particularly where the track attaches to the structure, you'll notice a lot of slotted holes and hinges. It's all to accommodate field adjustments and ease construction.
I get what you are saying. If I am correct this is the first time that RMC works with this type of steel structures apart from the tubical steel structures on their Raptor models so without doubt it will be a challange. But ofcourse, you have to do it to master it.
 

Hixee

Flojector
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Social Media Team
I get what you are saying. If I am correct this is the first time that RMC works with this type of steel structures apart from the tubical steel structures on their Raptor models so without doubt it will be a challange. But ofcourse, you have to do it to master it.
Storm Chaser has a steel lattice structure - so not their first-first, although the first from the ground up.
 

Hyde

Matt SR
Staff member
Moderator
Social Media Team
In short, the steel structure also allows for smaller footprint than wooden structure, something ultimately desired by Funspot as they have this coaster weaving through and over much of the park's existing structures, paths, etc. This isn't anything new - wooden coaster manufacturers have used steel structures for years (which is partly why Storm Chaser has a steel structure, a la Twisted Twins), on the same premise of needing smaller footprint, or added structural reinforcement for higher forces.

In terms of carbon footprint ... steel is worse by a couple orders of magnitude, if I recall correctly.
Exactly right (and a part of what my actual job is!) - a growing portion of American-made steel uses electric-arc process to blend in recycled steel and reduce input need of coal (a great source of carbon for raw feedstock), but even still wood has the far superior carbon footprint, even as you get into 100% renewably-sourced steel - it is still extremely energy intensive to produce due to the high temperature points that need to be hit. Wood gets a lot of carbon bonus both for sustainable sourcing (especially prevalent for Minnesota and Wisconsin forestry feedstocks, where a lot of roller coaster wood is sourced). Wood also acts as a "carbon sink", locking in carbon for a nice, long duration.

Couple good quick links on that front:
- Carbon intensity of building materials - https://www.canadianarchitect.com/embodied-carbon-key-considerations-for-key-materials/
- IEA report on Steel production and carbon intensity - https://www.iea.org/reports/iron-and-steel
- IEA report on Wood production and carbon intensity - https://www.iea.org/reports/pulp-and-paper
 

Indy

Mega Poster
I should have been more clear. Yes, this is RMC’s first ground-up steel lattice installation, but they’ve used the approach several times in the past on lift hills and inversions, notably Zadra, Wildfire, and Goliath.
 

Leon_K

Roller Poster
In short, the steel structure also allows for smaller footprint than wooden structure, something ultimately desired by Funspot as they have this coaster weaving through and over much of the park's existing structures, paths, etc. This isn't anything new - wooden coaster manufacturers have used steel structures for years (which is partly why Storm Chaser has a steel structure, a la Twisted Twins), on the same premise of needing smaller footprint, or added structural reinforcement for higher forces.


Exactly right (and a part of what my actual job is!) - a growing portion of American-made steel uses electric-arc process to blend in recycled steel and reduce input need of coal (a great source of carbon for raw feedstock), but even still wood has the far superior carbon footprint, even as you get into 100% renewably-sourced steel - it is still extremely energy intensive to produce due to the high temperature points that need to be hit. Wood gets a lot of carbon bonus both for sustainable sourcing (especially prevalent for Minnesota and Wisconsin forestry feedstocks, where a lot of roller coaster wood is sourced). Wood also acts as a "carbon sink", locking in carbon for a nice, long duration.

Couple good quick links on that front:
- Carbon intensity of building materials - https://www.canadianarchitect.com/embodied-carbon-key-considerations-for-key-materials/
- IEA report on Steel production and carbon intensity - https://www.iea.org/reports/iron-and-steel
- IEA report on Wood production and carbon intensity - https://www.iea.org/reports/pulp-and-paper
Thanks, interesting stuff. What exactly is your job if I may ask?
 
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