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Small News From The Theme Park Industry

bdrizzyb

New Member
It would appear that Pandemonium at Drayton Manor is up for sale: https://www.interlink-lg.com/used-rides/double-hammer/

Very interesting... we’ll have to see how this story develops.
I always thought that pleasurewood hills would suit pandemonium if Looping group ever decided to do a ride rotation, or for them to use pleasurewood as a Drayton scrap yard...just like what flamingo land did with pleasure Island.
 

spicy

Active Member
Didn’t know where to put this but it’s about B&M and doesn’t really warrant it’s own topic but just watched this video:


Start watching from the 10 minute mark and you will see this.




I thought B&M’s safety standards were higher than that and assumed there would be a sensor to check that both feet were secured before the train could be dispatched.
Apparently it’s down to the ride ops to visually check and the Six Flags ride ops just dispatched with his leg dangling down!
 
^ not sure B&M are at fault there. Looks like the leg guards are locked in, surely the coaster wouldn't be able to dispatch otherwise. It's down to the ride team to check everyone is secure.

The real question is how does a coaster enthusiast not notice their leg hasn't been secured, surely you'd have to be holding your leg up to avoid the shin guards?
 

Hixee

Flojector
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Yeah, I have several issues with that video. Both from Six Flags and Bybee.

I'm calling buffoonery on behalf of the riders - you'd have to be willingly or complacently stupid to not get your leg locked into those restraints.

Of course, doesn't excuse terrible operations, though. Sensors to detect a rider's leg would be a nightmare - you'd have to also then be checking that someone was in the seat. Generally the assumption for the manufacturers is that the operators follow the guidelines.

Either way, not a B&M issue.
 

MountedShooter

New Member
Six Flags over Georgia is my home park and I've ridden Superman Ultimate Flight 12 times this season. I almost had the same leg issue the weekend before this was filmed because the attendant was in such a hurry. In my case it was early in the day so it wasn't because they were ready to quit for the day. Operations for Superman have been notoriously bad for several years.

Superman already has enough problems that it frequently has multiple seats blocked and half the restraints have to be manually locked, adding sensors would only make it that much worse.

As to the policy about storing loose articles, it depends on the operators. Sometimes you can get away with just leaving them in the storage bins or even on the floor out of the way.
 

Hixee

Flojector
Staff member
Administrator
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Moved these posts into another thread. Nothing to do with Disney.

(Yes I'm not blameless, but acting now :) )
 

spicy

Active Member
Yeah, I have several issues with that video. Both from Six Flags and Bybee.

I'm calling buffoonery on behalf of the riders - you'd have to be willingly or complacently stupid to not get your leg locked into those restraints.

Of course, doesn't excuse terrible operations, though. Sensors to detect a rider's leg would be a nightmare - you'd have to also then be checking that someone was in the seat. Generally the assumption for the manufacturers is that the operators follow the guidelines.

Either way, not a B&M issue.

Agreed, does seem rather convenient that they rode separately, he was front row, and his friend just happened to be filming the train as it come into the station.

Six Flags can’t point the finger at them though as it’s still their fault for dispatching the train.
 

cookie

Member
Miragica in Italy (home to the Intamin accelerator Senzafiato) has officially been declared bankrupt due to the owner, Alfa Park, being liquidated. The park shut in late 2018 and interested buyers were sought, but all negotiations fell apart in October of last year in part due to the corona crisis. The court has ordered creditors to examine the status of the park by February 22nd, and whether the park will be saved or demolished is unknown.

The park had lost a cumulative 22.7 million Euros by the end of 2019 with a negative net asset value of 14.9 million against a cumulative debt of 21 million. Alfa Park also previously operated Rainbow MagicLand in Rome, but that park was successfully sold to a private equity firm in 2018.

Source (in Italian)
 
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