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Can or Tin?

What do you call a beans/soup metal container?

  • Can

    Votes: 8 50.0%
  • Tin

    Votes: 8 50.0%

  • Total voters
    16

Hixee

Flojector
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I would say a can of coke, a tin of beans.

That said, now I think about it saying it the other way round doesn't really stand out as being wrong.
 

jayjay

Active Member
For me, it's always a tin if it's soup/beans (paper sleeved, tin opener job). But now Hixee's mentioned drinks cans. Those are definitely cans.
 

NeoXIII

Best Newcomer 2016
I'm German, I go "dose". :p
I was taught that it's always tin, except when it's a drink like a coke.
 

GuyWithAStick

Captain Basic
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Can for both. I really only use Tin when talking about Foil or the actual element.

Sent from my VS820 using Tapatalk
 

Hyde

I Lied About My Age!
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It is a can - we stopped using tin to make them a long time ago. :p
 

Smithy

Well-Known Member
I'm a can man.

Definitely use it with can of sweetcorn. Think I alternate between can and tin when it comes to beans.
 

CoasterCrazy

Active Member
To me a can is anything with a ring pull....but I use them pretty much interchangeably.
But isn't the technical term a tin can? So surely both 'tin' and 'can' are just abbreviations of the same phrase? ;)
 

Ben

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Yh I was going to say, they're tin cans.

I would say a can for drinks, tins for food stuff.
 

gavin

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To me a can is anything with a ring pull....but I use them pretty much interchangeably.
But isn't the technical term a tin can? So surely both 'tin' and 'can' are just abbreviations of the same phrase? ;)
Technically, no because the "tin" in "tin can" is an adjective, not a noun. Through common usage "tin" used by itself in that context has become a noun, but if you're saying "tin can", it's the "can" that's actually holding something.

Plus, they're not made of tin these days anyway.

Anyway, it's an American VS UK thing. We would ordinary use "can" for soft drinks, but food comes in "tins". Americans have cans of food. If a Brit says, for example "a can of beans", it's yet another Americanism that is sneaking in.
 
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caffeine_demon

Well-Known Member
if it's drink - it's a can.
if it's custard powder, biscuits or confectionary - it's a tin
if it's soup, veg, pasta, pet food, curry etc. - I'm not too bothered whcih one you use!
 

Mack

Member
I'm American. So. A can is what holds things. A tin is a can that is being discussed by an Aussie/Brit. Also, Mysterious Sue, if you were wondering, in the States, no, they are "canned goods." "Tinned goods" is a phrase I've never heard before.

Anywayyyy, so you should probably say tin. Because we seem to like people who don't talk so good.
*Izzit. Sorry, forgot to put that there so you could understand me.

Not that it matters. Eventually you'll be skeduling your lunch breaks during which you will heat up soup from a can. We're just that nefarious.
 
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